Creating A Great App Store Page

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So you’ve developed your new app, tested it all out and now it’s time to release it to the wild. Your next step is ‘selling’ your creation in the app store. There are literally millions of apps in Apple and Google’s stores, so you will need to differentiate yours from the crowd.

Here are some helpful tips to creating a great App Store page.


1. Create Some Eye-Popping Product Photos

Strava’s screenshots show off their app’s running and cycling tracking abilities in a cool slideshow journey.

Strava’s screenshots show off their app’s running and cycling tracking abilities in a cool slideshow journey.

Show off your creation with screenshots that show what exactly your app does.

Use the idea of ‘Show Don’t Tell’ when creating your images. You should highlight the best and most intriguing features of your app so a potential downloader have a clear understanding of why they need your program.

If you have created a game - show off the gameplay interface.

Or if you built an app that simplifies personal finances, show a weekly budget maker tool.

Whatever your app’s most interesting and hopefully eye-catching page would be a great place to start. You should also guide your customer through the flow of your program with multiple screenshots. This will help them see what your app’s capabilities are without leaving them wondering if it’s worth downloading.

If it’s not 100% obvious what the screenshot is demonstrating, accompany the photo a some punchy description to nail home your message.

If you are going to use devices in your photos, make sure you are placing the images in the appropriate ones. If you’ve built an iOS app the screenshots should be shown on an Apple device, where as Google Play store photos should be on an Android device.

 

2. App Subtitle: Get To The Point

Evernote’s subtitle tells you exactly what you need to know despite their 1000 word Features section.

Evernote’s subtitle tells you exactly what you need to know despite their 1000 word Features section.

Your app’s subtitle isn’t that different than an elevator pitch.

You’ve got just 30 characters to tell people what your app does. That’s not a whole lot of space so it’s best to get to the point, and fast!

Don’t try to sell people on your app here - it’s purely the answer to ‘What does your app do’.

A helpful exercise for this is to imagine you are describing your app to your grandparents (or some other who’s less than super tech-savvy).

It may seem like you are underselling your apps feature set but resist the urge to get technical (that’s for later in the Features section).

Simplicity rules here.

 

3. Features - Time to Show Off

There’s not a ton of space to read about Slack’s app before you have to tap ‘more’, but they’ve given you the gist of the perks of using Slack.

There’s not a ton of space to read about Slack’s app before you have to tap ‘more’, but they’ve given you the gist of the perks of using Slack.

Now that you’ve got someone’s attention with your eye-cathcing screenshots and hooked them in with your subtitle, it’s time to show off all the hard work you put into making your app in the features section.

The first sentence or two in your Features section will be visible above the ‘More’ button that expands to show your entire product description.

This means you will want to inform your customer on purpose of your app and why they need it.

Beneath the ‘more’ button is where you start to list the features and tools that separate your app from the rest.

Using bullet points will help your reader to find what they are looking for more easily than a blocky paragraph.

If you have any positive reviews from publications, you may want to feature them here.

This is where you can expand at length as to why your app is just what you curious reader is looking for.

 

4. Add Some Personality

How does the tree access the internet?    It logs on….

How does the tree access the internet?

It logs on….

Even the most business oriented apps can still be fun, right?

There’s no need for a dry and stuffy description of your product.

Slack, the business communication program, have shown off a little humour to their feature updates and release notes which are not alway the most interesting thing to read. But as they have described, there’s more to it than just having fun.

It shows your customers that there are real people programming and coding this app, who are listening to your issues. They also know how to how some fun while trying to make educating their users a little more enjoyable.

Don’t over-do it at the risk of looking unreliable, but adding some personality to your App Store Page will help you stand out and potentially gain more customers.

 

What Should You Do Now?

Ensure you know the application requirements

Navigating your way through the requirements of the Apple App Store and Google Play Store can be a little tricky. Each store has it’s own quirks and differences so it’s best to follow the rules and ensure your application is sound to avoid an unwanted rejection letter.

Ask For A 2nd Opinion On How To Describe Your App

As the creator of your app, you might actually be a little too close to it. A second set of eyes can give you some clarity as to how your app is perceived by others.

After all, it was your creation - you know every nook and cranny whereas the people you’d like to download and use it don’t know anything about it yet.

If you can’t find anyone - We are happy to help too!

Don’t Know Where To Start?

We would be happy to help you out with that! Hope Media House have years of experience in successfully submitting, publishing and updating apps in the both the Apple App Store and Google Play Store. We can help with ensuring your app is approved, designing screenshots and providing fun, informative copy for all kinds of apps.

Let us know if you need a hand below:

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